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Aristotle

I am indebted to my father for living, but to m…

I am indebted to my father for living, but to my teacher for living well.{His teacher was the legendary philosopher Aristotle}

I am indebted to my father for living, but to my teacher for living well.{His teacher was the legendary philosopher Aristotle}

They are fond of fun and therefore witty, wit b…

They are fond of fun and therefore witty, wit being well-bred insolence.

They are fond of fun and therefore witty, wit being well-bred insolence.

It is a great thing, indeed, to make a proper u…

It is a great thing, indeed, to make a proper use of the poetical forms, as also of compounds and strange words. But the greatest thing by far is to be a master of metaphor. It is the one thing that cannot be learnt from others; and it is also a sign of genius, since a good metaphor implies an intuitive perception of the similarity in dissimilars.

It is a great thing, indeed, to make a proper use of the poetical forms, as also of compounds and strange words. But the greatest thing by far is to be a master of metaphor.…

The greatest thing by far is to be a master of …

The greatest thing by far is to be a master of metaphor; it is the one thing that cannot be learnt from others; and it is also a sign of genius, since a good metaphor implies an intuitive perception of the similarity in the dissimilar.

The greatest thing by far is to be a master of metaphor; it is the one thing that cannot be learnt from others; and it is also a sign of genius, since a good metaphor…

The happy life is thought to be one of excellen…

The happy life is thought to be one of excellence; now an excellent life requires exertion, and does not consist in amusement. If Eudaimonia, or happiness, is activity in accordance with excellence, it is reasonable that it should be in accordance with the highest excellence; and this will be that of the best thing in us.

The happy life is thought to be one of excellence; now an excellent life requires exertion, and does not consist in amusement. If Eudaimonia, or happiness, is activity in accordance with excellence, it is reasonable…

Now since shame is a mental picture of disgrace…

Now since shame is a mental picture of disgrace, in which we shrink from the disgrace itself and not from its consequences, and we only care what opinion is held of us because of the people who form that opinion, it follows that the people before whom we feel shame are those whose opinion of us matters to us.

Now since shame is a mental picture of disgrace, in which we shrink from the disgrace itself and not from its consequences, and we only care what opinion is held of us because of the…

For it is owing to their wonder that men both n…

For it is owing to their wonder that men both now begin and at first began to philosophize.

For it is owing to their wonder that men both now begin and at first began to philosophize.

It is this simplicity that makes the uneducated…

It is this simplicity that makes the uneducated more effective than the educated when addressing popular audiences—makes them, as the poets tell us, 'charm the crowd's ears more finely.' Educated men lay down broad general principles; uneducated men argue from common knowledge and draw obvious conclusions.

It is this simplicity that makes the uneducated more effective than the educated when addressing popular audiences—makes them, as the poets tell us, ‘charm the crowd’s ears more finely.’ Educated men lay down broad general…

These virtues are formed in man by his doing th…

These virtues are formed in man by his doing the actions ... The good of man is a working of the soul in the way of excellence in a complete life.

These virtues are formed in man by his doing the actions … The good of man is a working of the soul in the way of excellence in a complete life.

The truth is that, just as in the other imitati…

The truth is that, just as in the other imitative arts one imitation is always of one thing, so in poetry the story, as an imitation of action, must represent one action, a complete whole, with its several incidents so closely connected that the transposal or withdrawal of any one of them will disjoin and dislocate the whole. For that which makes no perceptible difference by its presence or absence is no real part of the whole.

The truth is that, just as in the other imitative arts one imitation is always of one thing, so in poetry the story, as an imitation of action, must represent one action, a complete whole,…

The tragic fear and pity may be aroused by the …

The tragic fear and pity may be aroused by the Spectacle; but they may also be aroused by the very structure and incidents of the play—which is the better way and shows the better poet. The Plot in fact should be so framed that even without seeing the things take place, he who simply hears the account of them shall be filled with horror and pity at the incidents; which is just the effect that the mere recital of the story in Oedipus would have on one. To produce this same effect by means of the Spectacle is less artistic, and requires extraneous aid.

The tragic fear and pity may be aroused by the Spectacle; but they may also be aroused by the very structure and incidents of the play—which is the better way and shows the better poet.…

Aristotle… a mere bond-servant to his logic, …

Aristotle... a mere bond-servant to his logic, thereby rendering it contentious...

Aristotle… a mere bond-servant to his logic, thereby rendering it contentious…

There is only one way to avoid criticism: do no…

There is only one way to avoid criticism: do nothing, say nothing, and be nothing.

There is only one way to avoid criticism: do nothing, say nothing, and be nothing.

Criticism is something you can easily avoid — b…

Criticism is something you can easily avoid — by saying nothing, doing nothing, and being nothing.

Criticism is something you can easily avoid — by saying nothing, doing nothing, and being nothing.

To avoid criticism say nothing, do nothing, be …

To avoid criticism say nothing, do nothing, be nothing.

To avoid criticism say nothing, do nothing, be nothing.

When I saw that Moses’ version of the Genesis o…

When I saw that Moses’ version of the Genesis of the world did not fit sufficiently in many ways with Aristotle and the rest of the philosophers, I began to have doubts about the truth of all philosophers and started to investigate the secrets of nature.

When I saw that Moses’ version of the Genesis of the world did not fit sufficiently in many ways with Aristotle and the rest of the philosophers, I began to have doubts about the truth…

No great mind has ever existed without a touch …

No great mind has ever existed without a touch of madness.

No great mind has ever existed without a touch of madness.

Every skill and every inquiry, and similarly ev…

Every skill and every inquiry, and similarly every action and rational choice, is thought to aim at some good; and so the good had been aptly described as that at which everything aims.

Every skill and every inquiry, and similarly every action and rational choice, is thought to aim at some good; and so the good had been aptly described as that at which everything aims.

It is impossible, or not easy, to alter by argu…

It is impossible, or not easy, to alter by argument what has long been absorbed by habit

It is impossible, or not easy, to alter by argument what has long been absorbed by habit

Fame means being respected by everybody, or hav…

Fame means being respected by everybody, or having some quality that is desired by all men, or by most, or by the good, or by the wise.

Fame means being respected by everybody, or having some quality that is desired by all men, or by most, or by the good, or by the wise.

All human happiness or misery takes the form of…

All human happiness or misery takes the form of action; the end for which we live is a certain kind of action.

All human happiness or misery takes the form of action; the end for which we live is a certain kind of action.

For he who lives as passion directs will not he…

For he who lives as passion directs will not hear argument that dissuades him, nor understand it if he does; and how can we persuade one in such a state to change his ways?

For he who lives as passion directs will not hear argument that dissuades him, nor understand it if he does; and how can we persuade one in such a state to change his ways?

If, however, the poetic end might have been as …

If, however, the poetic end might have been as well or better attained without sacrifice of technical correctness in such matters, the impossibility is not to be justified, since the description should be, if it can, entirely free from error.

If, however, the poetic end might have been as well or better attained without sacrifice of technical correctness in such matters, the impossibility is not to be justified, since the description should be, if it…

And further, observing that all this indetermin…

And further, observing that all this indeterminate substance is in motion, and that no true predication can be made of that which changes, they supposed that it is impossible to make any true statement about that which is in all ways and entirely changeable. For it was from this supposition that there blossomed forth the most extreme view of those which we have mentioned, that of the professed followers of Heraclitus, and such as Cratylus held, who ended by thinking that one need not say anything, and only moved his finger; and who criticized Heraclitus for saying that one cannot enter the same river twice, for he himself held that it cannot be done even once.

And further, observing that all this indeterminate substance is in motion, and that no true predication can be made of that which changes, they supposed that it is impossible to make any true statement about…

That which is in locomotion must arrive at the …

That which is in locomotion must arrive at the half-way stage before it arrives at the goal.

That which is in locomotion must arrive at the half-way stage before it arrives at the goal.

Aristotle’s opinion… that comets were nothing…

Aristotle's opinion... that comets were nothing else than sublunary vapors or airy meteors... prevailed so far amongst the Greeks, that this sublimest part of astronomy lay altogether neglected; since none could think it worthwhile to observe, and to give an account of the wandering and uncertain paths of vapours floating in the Ether.

Aristotle’s opinion… that comets were nothing else than sublunary vapors or airy meteors… prevailed so far amongst the Greeks, that this sublimest part of astronomy lay altogether neglected; since none could think it worthwhile to…

The Ideal age for marriage in men is 35. The Id…

The Ideal age for marriage in men is 35. The Ideal age for marriage in women is 18

The Ideal age for marriage in men is 35. The Ideal age for marriage in women is 18

By myth I mean the arrangement of the incidents

By myth I mean the arrangement of the incidents

By myth I mean the arrangement of the incidents

Hence intellect[ual perception] is both a begin…

Hence intellect[ual perception] is both a beginning and an end, for the demonstrations arise from these, and concern them. As a result, one ought to pay attention to the undemonstrated assertions and opinions of experienced and older people, or of the prudent, no less than to demonstrations, for, because the have an experienced eye, they see correctly.

Hence intellect[ual perception] is both a beginning and an end, for the demonstrations arise from these, and concern them. As a result, one ought to pay attention to the undemonstrated assertions and opinions of experienced…

Again, it is absurd to hold that a man ought to…

Again, it is absurd to hold that a man ought to be ashamed of being unable to defend himself with his limbs, but not of being unable to defend himself with speech and reason, when the use of rational speech is more distinctive of a human being than the use of his limbs. And if it be objected that one who uses such power of speech unjustly might do great harm, that is a charge which may be made in common against all good things except virtue, and above all against the things that are most useful, as strength, health, wealth, generalship. A man can confer the greatest of benefits by a right use of these, and inflict the greatest of injuries by using them wrongly.

Again, it is absurd to hold that a man ought to be ashamed of being unable to defend himself with his limbs, but not of being unable to defend himself with speech and reason, when…

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